Taste, Touch, Handle

Franklin Street Presbyterian Church, Baltimore…that you may consecrate to God an enriched man.

From This Day in Presbyterian History, Machen reflects on his father. I especially enjoyed this bit:

He was a profoundly Christian man, who had read widely and meditated earnestly upon the really great things of our holy Faith. His Christian experience was not of the emotional or pietistical type, but was a quiet stream whose waters ran deep. He did not adopt that “Touch not, taste not, handle not” attitude toward the good things or the wonders of God’s world which too often today causes earnest Christian people to consecrate to God only an impoverished man, but in his case true learning and true piety went hand in hand. Every Sunday morning and Sunday night, and on Wednesday night, he was in his place in Church, and a similar faithfulness characterized all his service as an elder in the Presbyterian Church. At that time the Protestant churches had not yet become political lobbies, and Presbyterian elders were chosen not because they were “outstanding men (or women) in the community,” but because they were men of God. I love to think of that old Presbyterian session in the Franklin Street Presbyterian Church of Baltimore. [pictured, above right]

It is a refreshing memory in these days of ruthless and heartless machinery in the Church. God grant that the memory may some day become actuality again and that the old Christian virtues may be revived!

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This entry was posted in Being Human, Christian life, Civil religion, Fundamentalism, History, Links, Machen, Old Life, Pietism, Protestant piety, Quotes, Reformed piety, Spirituality of the Church, Two-kingdoms. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Taste, Touch, Handle

  1. Zrim says:

    Wednesday night devotions–Bapterian creep.

  2. RubeRad says:

    I guess Machen is not OPC enough for you then; no true Scotsman.

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