It’s Like Watching Roger Federer Play

Ok, we ought not be given to over-statement.  And, being the second most uninterested North American male in athletics, I am loathe to make sports analogies.

But, come on, you have to admit that Clark makes it all look effortless.

While I can’t help but like the Vosian observation that pre- and post-mill views are two sides of the same skewed coin, I am still a bit more warm to finding forms of theonomy (hard and soft) to be versions of Cross-as-kick-off-prosperity-gospel. Some forms come in cheesy comb-overs on TV, while others come in sober, well-read intelliegentsia. For some it’s about personal health-and-wealth, for others institutional health-and-wealth. Then there’s everything in between for those a bit scanadalized by the cheesy comb-over or scared by the ominous leering of Rushdooney (man, that guy petrifies me just looking at him).

Are there really raised hands after, “For those in Christ, the sting of death has been removed but death has not”? What isn’t understood here? Everybody dies. If we are still subject to something as undeniable as death, what makes anyone think life in this age is all that different for those who have faith?

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10 Responses to It’s Like Watching Roger Federer Play

  1. Bruce S. says:

    I’ll bite. Who is the first most uninterested-in-athletics North American male? Could it be Rick B. who has been trying to sell his ’08 Detroit Tiger’s ticket package?

    More to the point of the post, it does seem to make sense to suggest that as the moment of our death approaches, the vain imaginations of our brain-projections will be the first going up in smoke.

  2. Zrim says:

    Bruce,

    Re the athletics thing, sorry about that, one of my play-button phrases only I know the reference to. Is it pathetic to have your own inside jokes and be satisfied with amusing only yourself? My wife says so. Anyway, no, it’s not Rick. It’s another friend of mine named Don.

    Re going up in smoke, funny how many unbelivers get that way before certain quarters of beliefdom. Calvin said we go to our deaths with an unbeliever still inside. Given how our inner unbeliever knows he’s up a creek, that can be more a good thing than bad.

  3. sean says:

    Yes, but we’re going to have to find a different way to practice the eschaton because if you practice the Lord’s supper more than once a quarter, it loses it’s specialness.

  4. sean says:

    And once a month is almost Roman catholic, what’s next, the rosary?!

  5. Zrim says:

    Sean,

    Isn’t Protestant religious bigotry fun? If it isn’t busy explaining why it’s not a good idea for a Mormon to be a US President its busy kocking the elements out of our hands because it’s “too Catholic.” I wonder if it would do that if it knew that once a year was Roman Catholic in Calvin’s day, that the latter had an “as often as you meet” view of the sacraments? Probably, ignorance is bliss.

  6. sean says:

    uugh, keep ’em in the dark, they’d probably seize on the whole once a year bit. We’d get lord’s supper “programs” and pageantry like at easter and christmas. On the flip side, I remember a priest staying with us for a week and setting up the eucharist on our T.V. He broke out the vestments and cloth. A little “magic” show just for us. Actually, I’m surprised Vision forum hasn’t sold a kit like that for the family altar. Or Hagee could send one out with his authentic “jewish prayer shawl.”

  7. Echo_ohcE says:

    DG Hart once mentioned annual communion in Scotland involving a whole week of preparation, almost like a camp meeting, which he said probably had something to do with the evolution of the camp meeting in the US.

  8. Zrim says:

    I always hated camping.

  9. Echo_ohcE says:

    Bugs, right?

  10. Zrim says:

    Echo, though raised in the under-developed sticks of northern Michigan and thus comfortable enough with nature, I’ve always been more of a city mouse…but does my metro-o-sity really show that much?

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