Guess the Good Guy

The point I make here by way of introduction, is that both cult and cultural activities all are religious; everything you do is religious. … Everything is religious, and we don’t divide our life into a religious and non-religious areas so that part of it God’s involved with, and part God’s not involved.

Whoever guesses correctly wins… a contest.

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23 Responses to Guess the Good Guy

  1. RubeRad says:

    What makes this even funnier is that it follows a crack about defining “cult” as an isolated group with strange ideas that lives in southern California…

  2. Rick says:

    R.S. Clark?

    Mike Horton?

    David VanDrunnen?

  3. Zrim says:

    Rev.,

    Gotch’ya. It’s called Guess the Good Guy.

  4. Then I am confused, which is not altogether new.

  5. RubeRad says:

    All (almost) good guesses, but all wrong.

  6. Zrim says:

    Jason,

    I hear you. I almost guessed Bahnsen until I remembered the title.

  7. Rick says:

    The “Good Guy” threw me – so I just picked some good guys and thought that it might be something that was said at a WHI taping.

  8. RubeRad says:

    I thought about disguising it as merely a “Guess who”, but what’s the point of posting a predictable quote?

    Is it time for a bigger hint yet?

  9. Rick says:

    So it’s not a “Good Guy” as we usually define it around here. Is it a morally good guy?

  10. RubeRad says:

    No, it is definitely a “Good Guy”, in a sense particular to the CO.

  11. Bruce S. says:

    The most counterintuitive answer has to be Kline. I’m going with MGK.

  12. RubeRad says:

    Ding Ding Ding!! We have a winner! (That is to say, MGK — sean snuck another guess in while I was typing)

    Here is some of the “…” to provide some context:

    Now a moment ago we were saying that within a theocracy, cult and culture, everything is holy there. … It’s when you get outside of the theocracy, it’s after the Fall, when you’re in this common grace situation … What about that non-holy cultural activity that you engage in in common grace? Now my point here is that too is religious. It’s not holy, but it is religious. It’s religious because it is the Lord who tells us to engage in these cultural vocations and these non-holy vocations. They’re not evil, they’re just not holy. It’s the Lord who tells us to engage in those things, just as he is the one who tells us to engage in worship. And it is unto the Lord that we perform those cultural functions — those secular, non-holy, cultural, — Everything we do, we do as unto the Lord … we live before the eyes of God and unto his glory no matter what we do. So everything is religious, and we don’t divide our life into a religious and non-religious areas so that part of it God’s involved with, and part God’s not involved. We have to do with God at every point. So that’s a simple point to make. I am misunderstood I think sometimes when I talk about culture being non-holy, suggesting that it’s not religious, but that’s not my position.

    I have been listening through these lectures by MGK on KP (from 2000), a second time, taking sparse notes as I go. I will publish the whole index when it’s done.

    But you can listen to Merry himself starting at 4:52 of 5B side 1, getting himself warmed up into his discussion of Covenantal Stipulations in the garden of Eden, Adam’s duty to construct the Holy City of God.

  13. sean says:

    cult and culture designations should have been the give away. I hate me some me.

  14. Rick says:

    ahhh…the best guy.

    What a trip.

  15. Zrim says:

    Ah.

    The first three rules of real estate–location, location, location–find their equivalent in the first rule of Reformed hermeneutics–context, context and context.

  16. "Lee N. Field" says:

    “have been listening through these lectures by MGK on KP (from 2000), a second time, taking sparse notes as I go. ”

    A _second_ time? My goodness, all the Kline stuff there amounts to like 60 hours of audio!

    (Yeah, yeah, I should listen to them again too. Just wish the audio quality was better.)

  17. RubeRad says:

    Yes, a second time — after the 1st time was done, I knew there were all kinds of great bits in there, and I had no idea where they were! Once my index is published, then you won’t need to listen a second time, you can navigate directly to the .mp3 and time offset you need for a particular topic.

    If I ever listen to the OT exegesis and OT prophets courses, I will take such notes the first time around.

  18. kazooless says:

    Rube,

    Just a reminder: don’t take notes and drive.

    K

  19. RubeRad says:

    A pad of paper is not a cellphone… I only have to pick up the notepad every 15-20min or so and scribble 4 digits and 3-4 words.

    What’s really tough is to write in the notepad without spilling my beer

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