Two Sides of a Modern Coin: Who Said That?

coins

How often the Fundamentalist attack on so-called liberalism — by which cultural Protestantism is meant — is itself an expression of a cultural loyalty, a number of Fundamentalist interests indicate. Not all though many of these antiliberals show a greater concern for conserving the cosmological and biological notions of older cultures than for the Lordship of Jesus Christ …. More significant is the fact that the mores they associate with Christ have at least as little relation to the New Testament and as much connection with social custom as have those of their opponents. The movement that identifies obedience to Jesus Christ with the practices of prohibition, and with the maintenance of early American social organization, is a type of cultural Christianity; though the culture it seeks to conserve differs from that which its rivals honor …. In so far as the contemporary attack on Culture-Protestantism is carried on in this way, it is a family quarrel between folk who are in essential agreement on the main point; namely, that Christ is the Christ of culture, and that man’s greatest task is to maintain his best culture. Nothing in the Christian movement is so similar to cultural Protestantism as is cultural Catholicism, nothing more akin to German Christianity than American Christianity, or more like a church of the middle class than a workers’ church. The terms differ, but the logic is always the same:  Christ is identified with what men conceive to be their finest ideals, their noblest institutions, and their best philosophy.

Answer:  Todd wins, H. Richard Niebuhr, Christ and Culture.

So, everyone is straight now that when Niebuhr says, “The terms differ, but the logic is always the same:  Christ is identified with what men conceive to be their finest ideals, their noblest institutions, and their best philosophy” that is what the Bible means by “traditions of men.” Right?

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7 Responses to Two Sides of a Modern Coin: Who Said That?

  1. RubeRad says:

    Reminds me of Christianity&Liberalism, so I’ll say Machen

  2. todd says:

    Richard Niebuhr

  3. Bruce Settergren says:

    The word prohibition is a red flag. I’ll say Machen as well.

  4. Chris Donato says:

    These are fighting words. I know from experience. In fact, why don’t we all go over to the Pyro blog and cajole Phil, now that he’s done a post offering a thumbnail history of liberalism, to do one on the history of fundamentalism?

  5. Zrim says:

    Chris,

    I was raised not to play with fire.

  6. Durell Flood says:

    Not going evangeli-conservo-whatever on you guys here, nor giving occasion for you to be cynical, but it is awfully wierd on that dime that it says, “In God We Trust.” If I’m not mistaken, that’s a Mercury dime bearing the said deity’s image. I never noticed that before this post. Oh, that and the fascies axe-stick thingy. Lots of Roming around here.

    -Zrim, I saw a Monty Python cut and thought of you today. The spiel about the “Spanish Inquisition.”

  7. Zrim says:

    Durell,

    I went to tie my shoes this afternoon after lunch and thought of Mr. Creosote.

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